Monthly Archives: October 2013

The T.C. Agnew Nature Reserve is officially open

Joan Berndt and Susan Campbell have made a legacy for their family – a living legacy of nature that will give back to the community forever.

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Tamarack: A different conifer

The name tamarack comes from an Algonkian word meaning “wood to make snowshoes”, telling us just how important this tree species was to the First Nation community.

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Scarlet Sumac Comes in Two Forms

On the Carden Alvar, a different form of sumac takes over where the thin soils over limestone bedrock create more difficult growing conditions. Fragrant sumac, as its name suggests, releases a pleasant citrus-like aroma when its young leaves are crushed. This species turns red in the autumn as well, but a somewhat softer, rosier shade than its staghorn cousin.

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Chasing answers on climate change

The level of certainty among scientists that human activity is affecting the global climate has increased, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC). Predictably, the level of rhetoric from climate change deniers has also increased.

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The Black-capped chickadee

The Black-capped chickadee, the species found in our area, has been described variously as sociable, industrious, agile, inquisitive, gregarious, trusting and acrobatic, and while they are all true, none of these adjectives fully describe this little bundle of cheerfulness.

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Carden Alvar Inspires Photography

After retiring six years ago, I decided to pursue a hobby that I didn’t seem to have time for while I was working – photography. Coincidently, I acquired my first digital camera around the same time that I discovered the Carden Alvar.

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