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KAWARTHA LAKES THIS WEEK

Carden residents worried about proposed shooting centre

The City says no site plan application has been received for a shooting range proposed in middle of Carden Alvar

 Carden Township residents are worried about a shooting centre proposed for the middle of the Carden Alvar.

City of Kawartha Lakes Mayor Andy Letham, CAO Ron Taylor and Ward 1 Councillor Rob Macklem all told This Week there has been no site plan application submitted to the City, and until they see one they cannot comment.

According to the Premier Shooting Centre website, the proponents were seeking investors for the project. 

The website states the property is 1,350 acres on Wylie Road, close to Beaverton, Kirkfield and Orillia, and gives directions.

“The proposal does not have any municipal approval.” CAO Ron TaylorWhile there are no posts after August of last year, there is a statement which reads:

“We have spent years in developing a solid relationship with the Kawartha Lakes region township decision makers. We have chosen the land area specifically because it affords the right criteria to support the business plan – not the other way around.

“We have the ‘go ahead’ with local authorities before looking to build, which means the range is fully supported by the municipality, which drastically reduces any roadblocks that could stall/stop the build of the range.”

This Week reached out to Derek Jones of Premier Shooting Centre asking for comment, including whether he has purchased the Wylie Road property and about the website’s claim the City supports the project. He said he did not wish to comment at this time.

But,  Coun. Macklem said he has received “about 100 emails” and held a town hall meeting after residents became increasingly concerned.

He said he has heard from his constituents that there is a conditional offer on the property.

Read more of this article on their website

 

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MEDIA RELEASE

Ontario Trillium Foundation Supports Local Conservation with $18,600 Grant

On Wednesday April 18th The Couchiching Conservancy hosted a Lunch and Learn for both new and experienced volunteers on the subject of Invasive Species in our region. This important training secession was hosted thanks to funds provided by the OTF and will mark the launch of work done as a result of the grant.

Staff and volunteers show appreciation for OTF.

The Couchiching Conservancy’s Citizen Science Field Technician, Meagan Coughlin, said that the grant from OTF: “The Ontario Trillium Foundation has provided generous support and seed money to The Conservancy’s new citizen science initiative. Thanks to this grant from the OTF our volunteers benefit from improved training and understanding of environmental issues in the region.  This work will ultimately improve the ecological health of the Couchiching region for all of its citizens for years to come. “

An agency of the Government of Ontario, the Ontario Trillium Foundation (OTF) is one of Canada’s largest granting foundations. With a budget of over $136 million, OTF awards grants to some 1,000 projects every year to build healthy and vibrant Ontario communities. www.otf.ca


PRESS RELEASE

The Couchiching Conservancy applauds the Government of Canada’s commitment to nature and biodiversity with $1.3 investment over 5 years

ORILLIA, ON

March 1, 2018 — The Couchiching Conservancy (CC) applauds the announcement in Budget 2018 that significant new funds will be earmarked to protect Canada’s nature, parks, wild spaces and species at risk.

The investment of $1.3 billion over 5 years affirms Canada’s commitment to protecting our lands and our waters and the variety of species they sustain. Conservation of our natural areas ensures our country will remain a place where people want to live, work and invest. Protecting the environment and growing our economy go hand in hand.

“We’re really pleased to see the federal government putting a priority on protecting our cherished landscapes,” said Executive Director Mark Bisset. “The Couchiching Conservancy has protected more than 1,000 acres in this region in the last 15 months and we can do much more with the right tools. This budget is recognizing the importance of private land conservation and setting the stage for some powerful partnerships.”

The budget states:
“The Government of Canada proposes to make historic investments totalling $1.3 billion over five years, one of the most significant investments in nature conservation in Canadian history—a true legacy for our children and grandchildren. This investment will contribute $500 million from the federal government to create a new $1 billion Nature Fund in partnership with corporate, not-for profit, provincial, territorial and other partners.”

Budget 2018 supports Canada Target 1 — the pledge to protect 17 per cent of our land and inland waters and 10 per cent of our coastal and marine areas by the end of the decade. Around the world, countries are forging ahead to reach these global targets by 2020. CC is pleased to see the Government of Canada charting a pathway to meet these goals, with a meaningful investment in public, private and Indigenous protected areas.

“We think people in this area really care about their natural places. We have a pledge signed by more than 2,000 people that supports the work of the conservancy and we know there are many more out there who want to see nature kept close,” Bisset said. “The conservancy and land trusts right across the country can help Canada meet its conservation goals. We’re ready and willing.”

Throughout Canada, critical conservation work is being done on local and regional scales by the country’s land trusts. As community-driven, non-profit conservation organizations, land trusts work to protect important natural areas for the benefit of all by holding land in trust for future generations. Support by the federal government through the Natural Areas Conservation Program is an essential factor in land trusts’ ability to conduct their work and create protected natural areas in communities across the country.

About
The Couchiching Conservancy
The Couchiching Conservancy is one of the leading regional land trusts in Ontario. A non-government, charitable organization, it has helped protect close to 5260 hectares of important natural habitat in the Lake Couchiching region since 1993. Wherever possible, the lands are accessible to the public for the responsible enjoyment of nature.

Contact
Mark Bisset
Executive Director
mbisset@couchconservancy.ca


February 9, 2018

WASHAGO, ON

The Couchiching Conservancy has acquired 295 hectares (728 acres) of important natural habitat, including 4.4 kms of shoreline along one of the last wild rivers in southern Ontario: the Black River.

The property is one of several private parcels inside the boundaries of Queen Elizabeth II Wildlands Provincial Park. The region provides habitat for several species listed by SARA (Species at Risk Act) including: Blanding’s turtle (Endangered), snapping turtle (Special Concern), eastern hog-nosed snake (Threatened). In addition it is home to Ontario’s only lizard, the five-lined skink (Endangered), and numerous at-risk bird species.

Protecting the tract will improve the ecological integrity of the park and strengthen wildlife corridors. This protection will also secure a rare deep-sand valley left behind by receding glaciers more than 10,000 years ago.

With support from hundreds of donors, including a major contribution by the Government of Canada through the Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP), The Couchiching Conservancy was able to secure the property. The funds raised cover the price of the property, legal and appraisal costs, and a stewardship endowment fund that will ensure the organization can permanently care for the property.

The Government of Canada’s Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP) is a unique public-private partnership to conserve land across southern Canada. The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) manages the program. Federal funds are matched by contributions raised by NCC and its partners. Habitat conserved under the NACP enhances natural corridors and other protected areas.

I congratulate The Couchiching Conservancy for its work in the protection of 295 hectares of important southern Ontario habitat, through the Natural Areas Conservation Program. Our Government is committed to working with our partners to protect and recover Canada’s species at risk such as the Endangered Blanding’s turtle, and the many other species that call this valley home. By working together, we can all make a difference for Canada’s wildlife.

-Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada  

“This contribution from Environment and Climate Change Canada is a critical building-block in our campaign to raise the funds necessary to protect the Black River Wildlands,” said Doug Christie, president of the Orillia-based land trust. “We are really grateful that the federal government recognizes the importance of this community-driven effort to protect such a beautiful tract, so close to a large urban population.”

“The Nature Conservancy of Canada applauds the work of The Couchiching Conservancy in its efforts to preserve this important shoreline area and the many species that rely on it,” said John Lounds, president and chief executive officer. “Through the Natural Areas Conservation Program, NCC is pleased to partner with Environment and Climate Change Canada and groups across the country on the protection of important habitats”.

About

The Couchiching Conservancy is one of the leading regional land trusts in Ontario. A non-government, charitable organization, it has helped protect close to 5260 hectares of important natural habitat in the Lake Couchiching region since 1993. Wherever possible, the lands are accessible to the public for the responsible enjoyment of nature.

The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is the nation’s leading not-for-profit, private land conservation organization, working to protect our most important natural areas and the species they sustain. Since 1962, NCC and its partners have helped to protect more than 1.1 million hectares (2.8 million acres), coast to coast to coast. To learn more, visit www.natureconservancy.ca.

For more information on the Natural Areas Conservation Program, please visit:

http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/what-we-do/conservation-program/

For information on The Black River Wildlands Project, please contact:

  • Tanya Clark, Development Coordinator: 705-326-1620; tanya@couchconservancy.ca
  • Mark Bisset, Executive Director: 705-326-1620; mbisset@couchconservancy.ca

For more information, go to:

www.couchichingconserv.ca/protect-the-black-river-wildlands/

For a selection of downloadable photos for publication, go to:

www.flickr.com/photos/90805956@N07/sets/72157681877215823


9 février 2018

WASHAGO, ON

L’organisme The Couchiching Conservancy a fait l’acquisition de 295 hectares (728 acres) d’habitat naturel important, incluant 4,4 kilomètres de rivage d’une des dernières rivières sauvages dans le sud de l’Ontario, la Black River.

Cette propriété est une de plusieurs parcelles privées à l’intérieur des limites du parc provincial Queen Elizabeth II Wildlands. La région abrite plusieurs espèces protégées par la LEP (Loi sur les espèces en péril), incluant : la tortue mouchetée (en voie de disparition), la chélydre serpentine (espèce préoccupante) et la couleuvre à nez plat (espèce menacée). En outre, elle est l’habitat de la seule espèce de lézard en Ontario, le scinque pentaligne (en voie de disparition), et de plusieurs espèces d’oiseaux en péril.

La protection de cette parcelle améliorera l’intégrité écologique du parc et renforcera des corridors fauniques. Cette protection englobe aussi une vallée de sable profond laissée par le recul des glaciers il y a plus de 10 000 ans.

Grâce à l’appui de centaines de donateurs et à une importante contribution du gouvernement du Canada dans le cadre du Programme de conservation des zones naturelles (PCZN), The Couchiching Conservancy a pu faire l’acquisition de la propriété. Les fonds collectés couvrent le prix de la propriété et les frais juridiques et d’évaluation, et permettent la création d’un fonds de dotation d’intendance garantissant que l’organisme pourra entretenir la propriété de manière permanente.

Le Programme de conservation des zones naturelles (PCZN) du gouvernement du Canada est un partenariat public-privé unique visant la conservation des terres dans tout le sud du Canada. Conservation de la nature Canada (CNC) gère le programme. Des fonds fédéraux s’ajoutent aux contributions collectées par CNC et ses partenaires. L’habitat conservé sous l’égide du PCZN améliore les corridors naturels et d’autres zones protégées.

« Je félicite l’organisme The Couchiching Conservancy pour son travail visant à protéger 295 hectares d’habitat dans le sud de l’Ontario, dans le cadre du Programme de conservation des zones naturelles. Notre gouvernement s’est engagé à travailler avec ses partenaires pour protéger et rétablir des espèces en péril du Canada, comme la tortue mouchetée en voie de disparition, et de nombreuses autres espèces qui vivent dans cette vallée. En travaillant ensemble, nous pouvons protéger et améliorer des écosystèmes diversifiés pour nos enfants et nos petits-enfants. »

-L’honorable Catherine McKenna, ministre de l’Environnement et changement climatique du Canada

« Cette contribution d’Environnement et changement climatique Canada est un élément crucial de notre campagne de collecte des fonds nécessaires pour la protection de la zone Black River Wildlands, déclare Doug Christie, président de la fiducie foncière sise à Orillia. Nous sommes reconnaissants que le gouvernement fédéral reconnaît l’importance de cet effort communautaire pour protéger une superbe parcelle de terrain si près d’une grande population urbaine. »

« Conservation de la nature Canada applaudit les efforts de l’organisme The Couchiching Conservancy pour préserver cette importante zone littorale et les nombreuses espèces qui en dépendent, dit John Lounds, président-directeur général. Grâce au Programme de conservation des zones naturelles, CNC est heureuse de se joindre à Environnement et changement climatique Canada et à d’autres groupes partout au Canada pour la protection d’habitats importants. »

À propos

L’organisme The Couchiching Conservancy est une des principales fiducies foncières régionales de l’Ontario. En tant qu’organisme de bienfaisance non gouvernemental, il a aidé, depuis 1993, à protéger près de 5260 hectares d’habitat naturel important dans la région du lac Couchiching. Dans la mesure du possible, les terres sont accessibles au public pour jouir de la nature de manière responsable.

Chef de file en conservation de terres privées au Canada et organisme sans but lucratif, Conservation de la nature Canada (CNC) œuvre à la protection de nos milieux naturels les plus précieux et des espèces qu’ils abritent. Depuis 1962, CNC et ses partenaires ont contribué à la protection de plus de 1,1 million d’hectares (2,8 millions d’acres) d’un océan à l’autre. En Alberta, CNC a conservé plus de 11 300 hectares (280 000 acres) des terres et cours d’eau les plus précieux sur le plan écologique.

Pour plus d’information sur le Programme de conservation des zones naturelles, veuillez visiter :

http://www.natureconservancy.ca/fr/nos-actions/programme-de-conservation/

Pour plus d’information sur le projet Black River Wildlands, veuillez contacter :

  • Tanya Clark, coordonnatrice du développement : 705-326-1620; tanya@couchconservancy.ca
  • Mark Bisset, directeur administratif : 705-326-1620; mbisset@couchconservancy.ca

For more information, go to:

www.couchichingconserv.ca/protect-the-black-river-wildlands/

Pour un choix de photos téléchargeables pour la publication, visitez :

www.flickr.com/photos/90805956@N07/sets/72157681877215823


June 22, 2017 — WASHAGO — Today The Couchiching Conservancy launches the public phase of a fundraising campaign to protect a major section of one of the last wild rivers in southern Ontario.

“We have signed an offer to purchase a 730-acre tract of wilderness with 4.4 kilometres of the Black River running through it,” said Doug Christie, President of the Orillia-based land trust. “The deal is set to close at the end of January, 2018, so we have a very short window to raise the funds necessary to bring this beautiful tract under permanent protection.”

The land is one of several private parcels inside the boundaries of Queen Elizabeth II Wildlands Provincial Park, east of Washago. Protecting the tract will improve the ecological integrity of the park, strengthen wildlife corridors developing in all directions, and secure a rare deep-sand valley left behind by receding glaciers more than 10,000 years ago. The property provides unique habitat for numerous species at risk, such as Blanding’s and snapping turtles, eastern hog-nosed snake and numerous at-risk species of birds. It is also home to Ontario’s only lizard, the five-lined skink.

“We’re excited about the potential for hiking, canoeing and kayaking,” said Mark Bisset, the conservancy’s executive director.

The Ganaraska Trail, the second longest hiking system in Ontario, runs through a corner of the property, and the acquisition will improve river access for paddlers, he said.

The Couchiching Conservancy must raise $575,000 to secure the property, Bisset said. That sum includes the price of the property, legal and appraisal costs, and a mandatory stewardship endowment that will ensure the organization can care for the property permanently.

“We have had great support in the first phase of the project and we’re approaching the half-way mark of our target, but we are really going to need community support to put us over the top,” Bisset said. “This is  a rare opportunity to protect so much natural beauty with so much local history.”

The Couchiching Conservancy is one of the leading regional land trusts in Ontario. A non-government, charitable organization, it has helped protect close to 13,000 acres of important natural habitat in the Lake Couchiching region since 1993. Wherever possible, the lands are accessible to the public for the responsible enjoyment of nature.

For information on The Black River Wildlands Project, please contact:

Tanya Clark, Development and Outreach Coordinator:  705-326-1620; Tanya@couchconservancy.ca

Mark Bisset, Executive Director: 705-326-1620; mbisset@couchconservancy.ca

For more information, go to:

http://www.couchichingconserv.ca/protect-the-black-river-wildlands/

For a selection of downloadable photos for publication, go to:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/90805956@N07/sets/72157681877215823


9 février 2018

WASHAGO, ON

L’organisme The Couchiching Conservancy a fait l’acquisition de 295 hectares (728 acres) d’habitat naturel important, incluant 4,4 kilomètres de rivage d’une des dernières rivières sauvages dans le sud de l’Ontario, la Black River.

Cette propriété est une de plusieurs parcelles privées à l’intérieur des limites du parc provincial Queen Elizabeth II Wildlands. La région abrite plusieurs espèces protégées par la LEP (Loi sur les espèces en péril), incluant : la tortue mouchetée (en voie de disparition), la chélydre serpentine (espèce préoccupante) et la couleuvre à nez plat (espèce menacée). En outre, elle est l’habitat de la seule espèce de lézard en Ontario, le scinque pentaligne (en voie de disparition), et de plusieurs espèces d’oiseaux en péril.

La protection de cette parcelle améliorera l’intégrité écologique du parc et renforcera des corridors fauniques. Cette protection englobe aussi une vallée de sable profond laissée par le recul des glaciers il y a plus de 10 000 ans.

Grâce à l’appui de centaines de donateurs et à une importante contribution du gouvernement du Canada dans le cadre du Programme de conservation des zones naturelles (PCZN), The Couchiching Conservancy a pu faire l’acquisition de la propriété. Les fonds collectés couvrent le prix de la propriété et les frais juridiques et d’évaluation, et permettent la création d’un fonds de dotation d’intendance garantissant que l’organisme pourra entretenir la propriété de manière permanente.

Le Programme de conservation des zones naturelles (PCZN) du gouvernement du Canada est un partenariat public-privé unique visant la conservation des terres dans tout le sud du Canada. Conservation de la nature Canada (CNC) gère le programme. Des fonds fédéraux s’ajoutent aux contributions collectées par CNC et ses partenaires. L’habitat conservé sous l’égide du PCZN améliore les corridors naturels et d’autres zones protégées.

« Je félicite l’organisme The Couchiching Conservancy pour son travail visant à protéger 295 hectares d’habitat dans le sud de l’Ontario, dans le cadre du Programme de conservation des zones naturelles. Notre gouvernement s’est engagé à travailler avec ses partenaires pour protéger et rétablir des espèces en péril du Canada, comme la tortue mouchetée en voie de disparition, et de nombreuses autres espèces qui vivent dans cette vallée. En travaillant ensemble, nous pouvons protéger et améliorer des écosystèmes diversifiés pour nos enfants et nos petits-enfants. »

-L’honorable Catherine McKenna, ministre de l’Environnement et changement climatique du Canada

« Cette contribution d’Environnement et changement climatique Canada est un élément crucial de notre campagne de collecte des fonds nécessaires pour la protection de la zone Black River Wildlands, déclare Doug Christie, président de la fiducie foncière sise à Orillia. Nous sommes reconnaissants que le gouvernement fédéral reconnaît l’importance de cet effort communautaire pour protéger une superbe parcelle de terrain si près d’une grande population urbaine. »

« Conservation de la nature Canada applaudit les efforts de l’organisme The Couchiching Conservancy pour préserver cette importante zone littorale et les nombreuses espèces qui en dépendent, dit John Lounds, président-directeur général. Grâce au Programme de conservation des zones naturelles, CNC est heureuse de se joindre à Environnement et changement climatique Canada et à d’autres groupes partout au Canada pour la protection d’habitats importants. »

À propos

L’organisme The Couchiching Conservancy est une des principales fiducies foncières régionales de l’Ontario. En tant qu’organisme de bienfaisance non gouvernemental, il a aidé, depuis 1993, à protéger près de 5260 hectares d’habitat naturel important dans la région du lac Couchiching. Dans la mesure du possible, les terres sont accessibles au public pour jouir de la nature de manière responsable.

Chef de file en conservation de terres privées au Canada et organisme sans but lucratif, Conservation de la nature Canada (CNC) œuvre à la protection de nos milieux naturels les plus précieux et des espèces qu’ils abritent. Depuis 1962, CNC et ses partenaires ont contribué à la protection de plus de 1,1 million d’hectares (2,8 millions d’acres) d’un océan à l’autre. En Alberta, CNC a conservé plus de 11 300 hectares (280 000 acres) des terres et cours d’eau les plus précieux sur le plan écologique.

Pour plus d’information sur le Programme de conservation des zones naturelles, veuillez visiter :

http://www.natureconservancy.ca/fr/nos-actions/programme-de-conservation/

Pour plus d’information sur le projet Black River Wildlands, veuillez contacter :

  • Tanya Clark, coordonnatrice du développement : 705-326-1620; tanya@couchconservancy.ca
  • Mark Bisset, directeur administratif : 705-326-1620; mbisset@couchconservancy.ca

For more information, go to:

www.couchichingconserv.ca/protect-the-black-river-wildlands/

Pour un choix de photos téléchargeables pour la publication, visitez :

www.flickr.com/photos/90805956@N07/sets/72157681877215823


July 2: Orillia Lions Club shows their support for conservation (Orillia Packet & Times)

June 2015: Conservancy involved in project to engage over 100 students in new after-school program (Orillia Packet & Times)

May 2015: The first Passport to Nature is starting off on a good path thanks to sponsorship support (Orillia Packet & Times)

March 2015: Couchiching Conservancy receives Trillium Grant (Orillia Packet & Times)

February 2015: Significant work completed in 2014 (Orillia Packet & Times)

January 2015: Couchiching Conservancy celebrates 20 years. (Orillia Packet & Times)

 

Oro-Medonte Township, Ontario

If Copeland Forest has a place in your heart, you need a place at this forum
Group seeks public input on future of Copeland Forest
WHAT:  A public forum to gather input from user groups and residents about the challenges and opportunities regarding the future of Copeland Forest.
WHERE: Horseshoe Valley Ski Lodge, Alpine Room
WHEN: Saturday Nov. 3,  9 a.m. to 3 p.m.  Lunch buffet and refreshments.
CONTACT: Dorthea Hangaard, Project Manager  705-326-1620, dorthea@couchconservancy.ca

BACKGROUND:Copeland Forest is the largest intact forest within commuting distance of the Greater Toronto Area. It contains the headwaters of three significant watersheds, and is home to many rare plants and animals.  Situated on the edge of the Oro Moraine, it filters groundwater, producing high-quality drinking water for thousands in the region. Due to its beauty and accessibility, it is also very popular with recreational users.

In 2011, The Couchiching Conservancy received funding from the Ontario Trillium Foundation to lead a community-based stewardship initiative in the Copeland Forest. In partnership with the Ministry of Natural Resources, which manages the forest, the Conservancy has been working with community groups and businesses to establish a stewardship committee to help care for the forest. A scientific inventory of the forest has been completed to provide the best possible information to support the decision-making process. The committee, carefully balanced to represent those now active in the forest, is seeking feedback from the general public as it strives to set key stewardship goals for the future.

THE FORUM:The public forum will be facilitated by Dr. Gordon Ball, adult educator and professional facilitator. The “Open Space” format has been chosen to allow participants to set the agenda in a framework of basic rules, and participants can expect a refreshing approach. “This conference will incorporate the best elements of a good coffee break,” Ball said. “The information gathered will be used to create recommendations on the future stewardship of Copeland Forest”, said Dorthea Hangaard, project manager for the Couchiching Conservancy. “We chose this format because it will give participants a chance to be heard in a creative setting,” Hangaard said. “People are really passionate about this forest and we want to tap into that.”

For more information on the project, please go to:  http://www.couchichingconserv.ca/copeland-forest/news-and-events/