In the Field

Non-hibernating Mode; Nature in Winter

Anyone who knows me knows I am not a huge fan of winter. In fact, that would be putting it mildly.
Given that humans have not evolved to hibernate through winter, I must figure out a way to make it through to springtime

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Love Is In The Air – Barred Owls

Barred Owl. Photo by Arni Stinnissen.

Barred owls do not migrate, they are year round residents, so there is plenty of opportunity to see and hear them. Learn about these feathered friends.

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Stamping out Your Carbon Footprint

Exterior of the office

When brainstorming methods to improve your ecological footprint, the common examples such as recycling, turning the lights off, and carpooling come to mind. There are many other approaches, however, which will help you become more environmentally cautious.

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The Pure Dedication of Birders

Take the Christmas Bird Count season as an example. Any time between mid December and early January, alarms are waking birders up very early in the morning.

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Passport to Nature – Sponsors Needed

Passport to Nature

We are looking for sponsors for the 2017 Passport to Nature!

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Comparison: Birders versus Bird Watchers

I must clarify something. I am not a Birder – I am just a Bird Watcher! What’s the difference?

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Join Us For Thirty Days of Gratitude

Studies show that gratitude can change our lives. For the next 30 days, we’re going to express our gratitude for this amazing organization.

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Your Invitation to the Event of the Year

This year the Annual General Meeting is to be held on February 4th from 1:30-4:30 pm at Hawk Ridge Golf and Country Club.

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Annual General Meeting – Feb 4, 2017

You're Invited

Join us for our Annual General Meeting on Saturday, February 4 at Hawkridge Golf & Country Club. Doors open at 1:30pm, meeting starts at 2pm.

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Tracking wildlife in the winter

Grant's Woods in the winter

Snow provides a unique way of recording the passing-by of various species of wildlife. Their tracks and trails reveal not only what species are hanging around for the winter, but may also reveal some of their behaviours: Are they solitary or travelling as a family? Eating plants or catching prey? Denning in the snow or constantly moving?

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