Tag Archives: Ontario

Featured Bird: Northern Flickers

We are blessed by Woodpeckers! Worldwide, there are 210 different species, but in Ontario we only have 9 of them.

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Conservancy Volunteers Honoured by Province

Six of our volunteers were honoured at the Ontario volunteer service awards on April 23rd. The award ceremony included recognition from The Honourable Laura Albanese, Ontario Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

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Get ready for the Passport to Nature: With Maple Tree I.D.

When is a beloved maple tree not a beloved maple tree? When it’s not a native species. Of eight species of maple growing in Ontario, one has caught the ire of conservationists,and over the last decade or so quite lot of effort has been made to get rid it. The dark one in question is the Norway maple.

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In the News: Wildlife On the Move

A decade ago, we would visit Niagara-on-the-Lake for a glimpse of these species, and marvel that their ranges just barely reached into the southernmost bits of Ontario.

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Adventure Awaits with Night Sky Stewardship

As the sun sets day after day, not all natural resources disappear to the naked eye, especially in locations situated in central and northern Ontario

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You and the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario

We are not the owners of this Earth, we are merely its guardians for a short time. That being said, the pace of world trade, manufacturing and consumption has grown exponentially in the past century.

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Challenge Gift: Canadian Charitable Giving Landscape

As a longtime resident of Orillia and Simcoe County, I’ve watched our community grow, change and develop over time. Some of my favourite places in town – restaurants, stores, forests and playgrounds –are still here while others have been replaced or removed entirely.

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Passport to Nature

The Passport to Nature is your chance to go beyond the end of the woods and explore some of the properties that The Couchiching Conservancy helps to protect.

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Tamarack: A different conifer

The name tamarack comes from an Algonkian word meaning “wood to make snowshoes”, telling us just how important this tree species was to the First Nation community.

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Scarlet Sumac Comes in Two Forms

On the Carden Alvar, a different form of sumac takes over where the thin soils over limestone bedrock create more difficult growing conditions. Fragrant sumac, as its name suggests, releases a pleasant citrus-like aroma when its young leaves are crushed. This species turns red in the autumn as well, but a somewhat softer, rosier shade than its staghorn cousin.

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